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Document type
články
články
Document record
Source: BMČ - články
Title
Provision of Psychotherapy during the COVID-19 Pandemic among Czech, German and Slovak Psychotherapists / E. Humer, C. Pieh, M. Kuska, A. Barke, BK. Doering, K. Gossmann, R. Trnka, Z. Meier, N. Kascakova, P. Tavel, T. Probst,
Author
Humer, Elke
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, 3500 Krems, Austria.

Pieh, Christoph
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, 3500 Krems, Austria.

Kuska, Martin
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, 3500 Krems, Austria.

Barke, Antonia
Clinical and Biological Psychology, Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, 85072 Eichstätt, Germany.

Doering, Bettina K
Clinical and Biological Psychology, Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, 85072 Eichstätt, Germany.

Gossmann, Katharina
Clinical and Biological Psychology, Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, 85072 Eichstätt, Germany.

Trnka, Radek
Science and Research Department, Prague College of Psychosocial Studies, 14900 Prague, Czech Republic. Olomouc University Social Health Institute (OUSHI), Palacky University Olomouc, 77111 Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Meier, Zdenek
Olomouc University Social Health Institute (OUSHI), Palacky University Olomouc, 77111 Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Kascakova, Natalia
Olomouc University Social Health Institute (OUSHI), Palacky University Olomouc, 77111 Olomouc, Czech Republic. Psychiatric-Psychotherapeutic Outpatient Clinic, Pro mente sana, 81108 Bratislava, Slovakia.

Tavel, Peter
Olomouc University Social Health Institute (OUSHI), Palacky University Olomouc, 77111 Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Probst, Thomas
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, 3500 Krems, Austria.

Cited source
International journal of environmental research and public health. 2020, roč. 17, č. 13. ISSN: 1661-7827; 1660-4601 (elektronická verze).
Date of issue
2020
Language
angličtina
Country
Švýcarsko
Document type
články
DOI
Pubmed ID
Link
Record number
bmc20024903
Persistent link
English Abstract
Psychotherapists around the world are facing an unprecedented situation with the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). To combat the rapid spread of the virus, direct contact with others has to be avoided when possible. Therefore, remote psychotherapy provides a valuable option to continue mental health care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study investigated the fear of psychotherapists to become infected with COVID-19 during psychotherapy in personal contact and assessed how the provision of psychotherapy changed due to the COVID-19 situation and whether there were differences with regard to country and gender. Psychotherapists from three European countries: Czech Republic (CZ, n = 112), Germany (DE, n = 130) and Slovakia (SK, n = 96), with on average 77.8% female participants, completed an online survey. Participants rated the fear of COVID-19 infection during face-to-face psychotherapy and reported the number of patients treated on average per week (in personal contact, via telephone, via internet) during the COVID-19 situation as well as (retrospectively) in the months before. Fear of COVID-19 infection was highest in SK and lowest in DE (p < 0.001) and was higher in female compared to male psychotherapists (p = 0.021). In all countries, the number of patients treated on average per week in personal contact decreased (p < 0.001) and remote psychotherapies increased (p < 0.001), with more patients being treated via internet than via telephone during the COVID-19 situation (p < 0.001). Furthermore, female psychotherapists treated less patients in personal contact (p = 0.036), while they treated more patients via telephone than their male colleagues (p = 0.015). Overall, the total number of patients treated did not differ during COVID-19 from the months before (p = 0.133) and psychotherapy in personal contact remained the most common treatment modality. Results imply that the supply of mental health care could be maintained during COVID-19 and that changes in the provision of psychotherapy vary among countries and gender.
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